Law Website Design

Making resolutions are a grand tradition at the beginning of each year. For small law firms, extending your reach and increasing your client base may be among your resolutions.

ADA Compliant Law Websites

More consumers of legal services start their search for attorneys using online resources. But, many law firms still don’t have a website and of those that do, more than a few are sadly lacking. They omit vital contact information in convenient places, don’t make provisions for consumers searching on mobile devices, and have outdated designs and stale content.

It takes planning and effort to attract visitors to your law firm website. Once there, keeping them interested enough to take a desired action takes even more effort…and consistency. To get visitors and keep them engaged, watch for these trouble spots when designing and maintaining your website.

Over 33% of clients start looking for a lawyer online

You may be surprised to know that, after recommendations from family and friends, online searches drive over a third of clients to a particular firm. How’s your website look?

Nearly 100% of people looking for legal advice start online

So a third of clients looking for a lawyer start online, but 96% of people seeking legal advice start online. A solid, consistent blog or even an FAQ page positions you as an expert and can help convert potential client questions to just plain clients.

Mobile matters when people are on the go

Because mobile searches now outnumber desktop searches in ten countries (including the U.S.), making sure your site is optimized for mobile is crucial.

Smart law firms pay attention to Google’s new organization

Law firm marketing statistics don’t mean much if you don’t understand Google’s new search engine results pages (SERPs). With ads and maps for local searches appearing before the first organic search result (hopefully your firm), SEO and a good digital marketing plan are crucial.

How you are exposed and how to protect yourself online with Law Websites

Client, customer, and employee personal information in your possession can be subject to a data breach in a myriad of ways. E-mail addresses, banking, passwords, physical addresses, phone numbers and more can inadvertently find their ways to scammers, hackers, undesired marketers, and more. Most compliance and legal area employees have little idea how to go implement data protection from internet threats. What to do?

The Federal Trade Commission Act (FTC)[1914]

Regulates unfair or deceptive commercial practices. The FTC is the primary federal regulator in the privacy area and brings enforcement actions against companies. This includes failing to comply with posted privacy policies and failing to adequately protect personal information.

Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) [1986]

Protects certain wire, oral, and electronic communications from unauthorized interception, access, use, and disclosure.

Computer Fraud & Abuse Act (CFAA) [1986]

Makes unlawful certain computer-related activities involving the unauthorized access of a computer to obtain certain information, defraud or obtain anything of value, transmit harmful items, or traffic in computer passwords. The law has been in amended six times.

Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) [1998]

Requires certain website and online service providers to obtain verifiable parental consent before collecting, using, or disclosing personal information from minors under the age of 13. It also requires websites to post an online privacy policy, collect only the personal information necessary, and create and maintain reasonable security measures.

Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act (CAN-SPAM Act) [2003]

Governs sending unsolicited commercial email and prohibits misleading header information and deceptive subject lines. It also requires senders to disclose certain information, include a valid opt-out mechanism, and it creates civil and criminal penalties for violations.

Financial Services Modernization Act (GLBA) [1999]

Regulates the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information collected or held by financial institutions and requires customer notices and a written information security program.

Mobile Friendly Law Website Design

Law firm marketing statistics don’t mean much if you don’t understand Google’s new search engine results pages (SERPs). With ads and maps for local searches appearing before the first organic search result (hopefully your firm), SEO and a good digital marketing plan are crucial.

We find this hard to believe, too, but 40% of small law firms do not have websites, and 35% of those that do have not updated their site in the past three years. Fully 97% of law firms have zero personal content on their website. How will clients know you’re the one for them if your site looks the same as the lawyer’s down the street?

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Only One Third Of Law Firm Websites Are Optimized For Mobile Devices

Mobile Ready Web Design

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